McCarthy headshot

Emerson Fellow

Elizabeth McCarthy

12th Class, 2005-2006

Field Placement: FoodChange (New York, NY)

Beth and her field site partner Almas Sayeed formulated a comprehensive report on immigrant access to the Food Stamp Program, which included both quantitative and qualitative analyses of the eligible but nonparticipating immigrants living in New York.  As part of their research, they convened city and national officials, community leaders, and advocates from the research and non-profit sectors to discuss the high rates of unmet need in NYC as well as the barriers that disproportionately impact immigrants and their access to food stamp benefits.

Hunger Free Community Report:

Access to the Federal Food Stamp Program: An In-Depth Analysis of New York City’s Immigrant Communities, Estimates of Unmet Need and Barriers to Access, co-authored with Almas Sayeed, is a comprehensive analysis of the context of immigrant food stamp access in New York City.  The report includes maps of each of the City’s five boroughs highlighting those zip codes with the greatest concentration of eligible and non-participating immigrants and the results of advocate interviews describing barriers that disproportionately impact immigrant communities.  The final section of the report outlines policymaker and advocate generated recommendations to improve immigrant access.

Policy Placement: Families USA (Washington, DC)

Beth was part of the Health Policy department and developed a report on Medicare Part D legislation and its impact on both the existence and structure of State Pharmacy Assistance programs.  She was also involved in the Campaign for Children’s Health Care, a national message campaign focused on universal child health care coverage.  Additionally, she analyzed data and information for a series of fact sheets and reports related to populations of uninsured children.

Pre-Fellowship Education and Experience:

Beth graduated cum laude from Harvard College in 2005 with a degree in Social Studies and a certificate in Health Policy.  Her senior thesis examined how personal responsibility affects obesity policy in the United States. While interning at the Institute of Medicine, Beth collaborated on a paper published in the Annual Review of Public Health.  In her coursework and internships, she has studied issues of social justice, civic engagement, and health policy.  Beth’s activities in college included teaching civics classes in Roxbury, Massachusetts, lobbying for increased funding for HIV/AIDS treatment, and directing a mentoring program for teenage boys in transitional homes.

Publications